EFFECT OF SOME ANTIBIOTICS ON THE LIVER FUNCTION OF ALBINO RATS

0

Antibiotics are categorized as narrow, broad, or extended-spectrum agents. Narrow spectrum agents (e.g., penicillin G) affect primarily gram-positive bacteria. Broad-spectrum antibiotics, such as tetracyclines and chloramphenicol, affect both gram-positive and some gram-negative bacteria. An extended-spectrum antibiotic is one that, as a result of chemical modification, affects additional types of bacteria, usually gram-negative bacteria.

Many treatments for infections prior to the beginning of the twentieth century were based on medicinal folklore. Treatments for infection in ancient Chinese medicine using plants with antimicrobial properties were described over 2,500 years ago (Trissel, 2007).

Description

INTRODUCTION

Antibiotics are substances derived from microorganisms that inhibits or destroy the growth of other microorganisms. Antibiotics are used to treat infection caused by organisms that are sensitive to them usually bacterial or fungi. They alter the normal microbial content of the body (example in the lungs, bladder and intestine) by destroying one or more groups of harmless or beneficial organism, which may result in infection (such as thrush in woman due to over growth of resistances organisms. These side effects are most living to occur with broad-spectrum (those active against a wide variety of organisms (Nieves-Cordero, et al., 2005).

Resistances may develop by the microorganisms being treated, for example, through correct dosage or over prescription. Antibiotic should not be used to treat minor infection which will clear up unaided.